Controversy

Several days ago, I got a message from David G. Reichert, my representative in the U.S. House of Representatives (and the incumbent candidate in one of the New York Time’s "Races to Watch"). His letter started out:

As your Representative in Congress, I want to share with you some of the work I have been doing to assist orphans in underdeveloped countries.

I grew up in a family that adopted several orphans from underdeveloped countries so I’m glad to see this happening — I really am.

But what really makes me happy is that I get to hear from my elected representative unsolicited — for the first time, no less — advertising his work on such a controversial subject. He seems perfectly willing to stand up for what he believes in, even if it means that he loses the crucial anti-developing-nation-orphan vote.

6 thoughts on “Controversy”

  1. “anti-developing-nation-orphan vote”

    - they steal our jobs (because they work)
    - they spread diseases more often than US children in stable families
    - God punished them anyway
    - people are using them to take our attention away from the more pressing domestic issues

    Great to see that some people were not sure you were being sarcastic.

  2. At the risk of sounding like a conspiracy theorist.
    This letter, was it written by a computer?
    Was it targeted at you based on whatever the said computer can be primed with?
    I bet you USD $1 you can dig up someone who has a letter from the same politician talking about how he’s cracking down on illegal immigration or some other seemingly contrary position to what’s in your letter.

    Do we have a bet sir?

  3. Even if you liked it, unsolicited bulk mail is still spam.

    Had he sent out information about his position on these issues say a few weeks before some important votes about it, it would have been interesting. As it’s now, it’s just fishing for Novermber. See how much you like it when his office continues to bombard you with “his work” on any and all issues your neighbourhood is profiled to care about – in letters, automated phone calls and email, if oyu’re unlucky enough to have had mail contact with them.

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